Taking Jeremy Rifkin’s ideas to the next level, Michel Bauwens hits a really good lick here.

His thinking works both in the frame of Neighborhood Economics and Watershed Economics in a kind of operating system role:

Describing the commons-centric society to come he says: “Unlike proprietary capitalism, the value is deposited by a community of contributors in a common pool ; this is the core of the new value creation; this is the sphere of abundant knowledge that can be shared and reproduced at marginal cost; the infrastructure of cooperation is empowered and enabled by a new type of for-benefit associations, which do not command and control the production, but make it possible. They are most often foundations, like the Apache Foundation or the Gnome Foundation; around this is constituted a entrepreneurial coalition of enterprises, which provides employment to an increasing number of peer producers: 75% of linux contributors are paid by enterprises who operate on the market , and create market value on top of the commons. Other forms of peer-driven economies are constituted around distributed labor (crowdsourcing), social media (Facebook, Twitter). This new form of netarchical capital (the hierarchy of the network, hence ‘net’-‘archical’) that at the same time enables and empowers social cooperation and collective value creation through sharing and the commons, also captures the value.”

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